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Fungi on the March: My New Feature Story for Scientific American

jeudi 21 novembre 2013 — Evolution,Health
The human pathogenic yeast C. neoformans, a close and visually indistinguishable relative of a fungus that appeared mysteriously on Vancouver Island over a decade ago. CDC/Public Domain. Click for... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

The Good and Bad News about Frog Abnormalities

Mari Reeves has several deformed frogs living on her dining room table in Anchorage, Alaska. One of them, named Skinny by her literally minded six-year-old son, has a leg that bends back on itself,... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

New Views into the Octopus's Bizarre Moves

Image courtesy of Flickr/ideakitchn We’ve known for centuries that octopuses get around one of two ways: one, by crawling over surfaces with their arms, or, two, swimming with the help of... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

The only two equations that you should know: Part 1

The exponential relationship between equilibrium constant and free energy, the basis of chemistry and life. “Chemistry”, declared Roger Kornberg in an interview, “is the queen... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Americas' Natives Have European Roots

The 24,000-year-old remains of a young boy from the Siberian village of Mal’ta have added a new root to the family tree of indigenous Americans. While some of the New World's native... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Man's Best Friend or Oversized Rat?

mercredi 20 novembre 2013 — Evolution,Mind & Brain
Here’s something curious. The phrase “man’s best friend” didn’t appear in print, according to Google’s n-grams , until after the year 1750. Here’s something... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Fenced-In Lions Divide Wildlife Conservationists

Times are grim for the king of the beasts. Roughly 35,000 African lions roam the savannahs, down from more than 100,000 half a century ago, thanks to habitat loss, declining numbers of prey animals... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Comment un arbre mène des fourmis à l’esclavage

mercredi 20 novembre 2013 par Pierre Barthélémy — Biologie, Botanique, Acacias, Entomologie, Fourmis, Mutualisme, Symbiose
Le mutualisme, ce n'est pas qu'une histoire de banque et d'assurance. En biologie, ce terme désigne une association équilibrée entre deux partenaires qui en tirent un bénéfice. Un accord gagnant-gagnant, pour reprendre une expression de l'époque. Un des cas les … Continuer la lecture (...)

Winning two Nobel Prizes, turning down knighthoods: The legacy of Fred Sanger (1918-2013)

Fred Sanger (1918-2013) (Image: The Telegraph) British biochemist Fred Sanger died today at 95. He’s the only person to win two Nobel Prizes in chemistry, an achievement that is... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

How Your Morning Commute Resembles a Fungus

mercredi 20 novembre 2013 — Evolution
In many fungi, the DNA storage compartments called nuclei are not prisoners of the cells they reside in, the way they are in animals and plants. Instead, fungal nuclei are free to move about the... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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